Schedule for the Conference

Featured

Transforming Lives in Changing Times: Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapies in Practice

14th September 2019 at Roehampton University, London
9.30am – 7pm

Organised by the Humanistic & Integrative College of UKCP

Schedule for the Day

9.30 – 10.15 am
Registration, confirming choice of workshops, coffee and tea

10.30
Welcoming participants
Rozmin Mukhi

10.35
Overview of the Day
Sue Milner

10.40
Introduction to the College, its founding principles and role in the future of Psychotherapy
Tricia Scott

10.55
Update on the new HIPC Website – Website and Communications Committee
Sandra Phillips (HIPC Webmaster), Christine Nutt and Tree Staunton

11.15
World Café
Emily Hodgkinson & Sue Milner

12.45 – 1.45 pm 
Lunch

1.45 – 2.45
Workshops 1-9
(see full Workshop Programme)

2.45 – 3.15
Tea and Coffee Break

3.15 – 4.15
Workshops 10-18
(see full Workshop Programme)

4.30 – 5.15
Plenary
The formal part of the day will end with a plenary session chaired by the members of the HIPC Steering Committee. Participants will have the opportunity to give feedback about the conference, raise any questions about the College, and express ideas about how the College can be more inclusive and better address members’ needs.

5.30 – 7.00
Drinks reception
An opportunity for participants to meet each other and relax together.

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Conference & Workshops

Featured

Transforming Lives in Changing Times: Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapies in Practice

14th September 2019 at Roehampton University, London.

Organised by the Humanistic & Integrative College of UKCP

Conference : 10.00-17.00 

Drinks reception and chance for networking : 17.30-19.00 – all welcome to stay

We are living in an increasingly polarized world which raises many practice issues for those of us seeking to transform lives.  The Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapy College of UKCP is therefore excited to present an experiential conference to explore inspiring and informative ways different practitioners are working to meet these changing times. 

The aim of the Conference is to bring together College members, including students and trainees, to network ideas, learn and extend their practice across approaches. We have chosen practitioners who are at the cutting edge of their own field of practice to showcase the range, quality, depth and creativity of our work.  And we welcome practitioners from other modalities and from the wider professional field, to come and experience our approaches and be inspired. CPD Certificates will be available.

In the morning there will be a brief introduction to the College, its founding principles and current structure. The new HIP College website will be launched. This will be followed by a facilitated world café – an opportunity to explore together the challenges faced by our profession in this divided world and to discover our collective learning. 

The afternoon will be made up of workshops to learn about and experience in more depth the different and creative ways practitioners are addressing these challenges in practice.

All workshops reflect the core values of the Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapy College, which place relationship at the heart of practice. The themes chosen express the diversity of HIPC approaches to work with family, community, culture, society and ecosystem.  They include :

•  Raising awareness of unconscious white privilege
•  Race, Language and Culture
•  Working with refugees and asylum seekers
•  Conflict facilitation in post war Rwanda
•  Trauma arising from social crises
•  Gender variance : working with Trans, Non-Binary, Gender Fluid and Transition
•  Embodiment practices in the face of climate collapse
•  Mindfulness and embodied presence
•  Dance Movement Psychotherapy with disabled clients
•  Contemporary therapeutic practice with children and young people 
•  Working creatively in renal transplant aftercare

In particular we encourage students and trainees to join us in exploring the rich diversity of our research methodologies in our trainee research poster exhibition and to become part of the HIPC community. You are our future!

This promises to be an exciting conference and we expect places to fill quickly. A full programme and schedule for the day can be found here 

Prices have been kept as low as possible to encourage full attendance and include the drinks reception.

(Prices include an eventbrite booking fee)

UKCP Members — £48.56

UKCP Student and Trainee Members  — £21.91

Non-Members — £64.55

Non-Member Students and Trainees — £37.90

Book here: https://hipc.eventbrite.co.uk

Some overnight accommodation is available at the venue and has been reserved on a first come first served basis quoting event reference Kx 33191. It can be booked directly online via the following link: https://www.roehamptonvenues.co.uk/accommodation/

OUTLINE PROGRAMME

WORLD CAFE
Responding to the Changing World.
Facilitators Emily Hodgkinson and Sue Milner
World Café is a grassroots method of facilitating collaborative dialogue and harnessing knowledge and creativity. It is fun, simple, informal and efficient. It is an opportunity for all of us attending the conference to gather together, focus on the themes of the day and share our experiences and views.

WORKSHOPS  

For full details  — including abstracts, presenters’ biographies — see here

WHAT’S RACE GOT TO DO WITH IT?
Power and Powerlessness in Therapy
Workshop Leader: Jessie Emilion (Association for Cognitive Analytic Psychotherapy)
An opportunity to reflect on our positions in this social construct and explore the impact in our personal and professional life. Mapping will be used to enable recognition and make links to the relational process and the power dynamics that underpin such powerful social constructs.

WHITE PRIVILEGE AS A BARRIER IN  THE THERAPEUTIC ENCOUNTER
Workshop Leader: Martin Armitage-Smith (Institute of Psychosynthesis)
This experiential workshop seeks to address a gap in the consciousness of white practitioners around whiteness and its impacts. We make use of recent theoretical work in order to raise our awareness in this important area.

BEYOND CONFLICT RWANDA
Community Recovery and Reconciliation
Workshop Leader: Milan Bijelic (Processwork UK)
Presentation of the Community Facilitated Dialogue (Processwork Forum) as a central approach in the programme. There will be discussions among the workshop participants around their perceptions and views related to the historic role of colonial powers and the genocide against the Tutsi.

WORKING WITH CLIENTS IN CRISIS IN THE WAKE OF RECENT TRAUMATIC EVENTS
Workshop Leader: Rozmin Mukhi (HIPC Direct Member) 
Experiential exploration of working in integrative ways through case studies. In this workshop we will explore working with clients in crisis and suffering from traumatic events

AN INTERSUBJECTIVE APPROACH TO WORKING WITH ASYLUM SEEKERS AND REFUGEES
Workshop Leader: Lynn Linsdale (Bath Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
An experiential learning experience for participants through demonstration, discussion and role play. The workshop will address the issues of working with an interpreter and vicarious trauma.

COMMUNITY FORUMS
Brexit and Beyond
Workshop leaders: Milan and Leah Bijelic (Processwork UK)
Presentation and facilitated dialogue among workshop participants on a theme related to Brexit.

GENDER VARIANCE
Transitioning Lives
Workshop leader: Liza Heatley (UK Association for Transactional Analysis and Gender Identity Clinic )
This will be an interactive, participative workshop where we will learn more about clients who identify as gender variant or questioning.

BEYOND SIMPLISTIC SEXUALITY BINARIES 
Workshop leader: Grant Denkinson (Registrant, Sherwood Institute)
How do we feel when a client tells us they are neither straight nor gay? What if someone is struggling to find words to describe fluidity in their attractions? How do we support someone navigating relationships that don’t neatly divide between partners or friends or intimacies that are sort of sexual and sort of non-sexual?

OUR BODIES OUR EARTH
Earth Needs A Good Therapist
Presenter: Tree Staunton ( Bath Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
Every day in the media we hear worrying news about our planet’s worsening situation: scientists warn of imminent catastrophic climate change, environmental collapse and species extinction: dangers we cannot escape. What impact does this have on us and our clients? How do we deal with our awareness of this unfolding disaster? And what does the world need from us at this time? 

WILD AT HEART
Workshop leader: Michelle Whiteside (Re-Vision)
Alienation from the natural world is significant in our states of mental health. This workshop will take you into the surrounding outdoors to experience direct contact with nature and view yourself from a different perspective. The workshop will look at how this might enhance your own practice with those clients who might benefit from a different approach.

MINDFULNESS AND EMBODIED PRESENCE
Presenter: Maura Sills (Karuna Institute)
The workshop will provide an opportunity to experience ‘mindfulness and embodied presence’ as taught and practiced by Karuna. We will explore the ways in which this approach can be helpful to practitioners in their own self-care as well as its application in their own practice.

STAYING ALIVE
Working Creatively In An NHS Renal Unit
Workshop leader: Gillian Chumbley (Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre)
Keeping your practice  “awake and alive” within an organization which may not necessarily understand your ways of working. Different ways of integrating body psychotherapy methods will be explored and creative projects to stimulate engagement, curiosity and interest for patients undergoing dialysis treatment will be presented.

WORKING WITH AUTISTIC CLIENTS
Workshop leader: Katherine Uher (Northern Guild for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
What does a diagnosis of autism mean and what are the secondary mental health issues that arise when a person experiences a lack of understanding from the dominant culture. The workshop will include roleplay and reflection and the opportunity to experience life in a more autistic way.

WORKING WITH DISABILITY THROUGH DANCE MOVEMENT PSYCHOTHERAPY
Workshop leader: Jackie Edwards (Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy)
The use of Dance Movement Psychotherapy in the context of supporting non-verbal communication and expressing psychological and emotional needs will be presented.  Potential contributions of Dance Movement Psychotherapy to addressing behaviour described as challenging will also be considered.  The workshop will make connections with the value of these ways of working for children and adults with a disability, family carers and health care professionals’ supporting children and adults with a disability such as Autism, Learning Disabilities, or Dementia.

EVERY MOMENT OF PSYCHOTHERAPY IS RESEARCH 
Workshop and Research Poster Exhibition / Competition
Workshop leaders: Heward Wilkinson (SCPTI) and Julie Scully (CCPE)

A short introduction will outline the elements of the HIPC Research contributions. Drawing on the passion of a new generation, there will be poster presentations led by HIPC Students, together with a workshop to open up and dialogue about HIPC Approaches to Research.

CREATIVITY, HUMAN RELATIONSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT 
The Scope of Contemporary Therapeutic Practice with Children and Young People
Two workshops will demonstrate the range of work with children and young and people. There will be presentations from psychotherapists and therapeutic practitioners of their work in different contexts and including themes such as parent-infant psychotherapy, parental alienation, working with families and addiction, whole school approaches to wellbeing, therapeutic play with adopted children and families, healing youth violence, and the impact of social media and knife crime on young people. 

WORKSHOP ONE — chaired by Jocelyne Quennell (Convener HIPC Children and Young Peoples Committee) and Amina Thompson
Yvonne Osafo will introduce parent-infant psychotherapy.

Jennie McNamara will speak on parental alienation.
Joanna Parker will explore the themes in therapeutic practice with families where addiction is the challenge.
WORKSHOP TWO — chaired by Lizzie Smosarski and Derek Williams
Lydia Noor will present on whole school wellbeing.

Louis Sydney will share therapeutic play with adopted children. 
Ebinehita Lyere will talk about healing youth violence and knife crime.

TALKING THERAPIES IN THE NHS
The State of Play
A panel of practitioners experienced in working in the context of the NHS will review the current scene and bring us up to date on the impact of projects such as Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT), the Scope of Practice and Education framework (SCoPed) and the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE).

Book here: https://hipc.eventbrite.co.uk

For full details  — including abstracts, presenters’ biographies — see here


WORKSHOPS TO BE CONFIRMED:

THE USE OF PSYCHODRAMA IN THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES
Workshop LeaderPeter Haworth (British Association for Psychodrama)

 

Full List of Workshops

Transforming Lives in Changing Times: Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapies in Practice

14th September 2019 at Roehampton University, London.

Organised by the Humanistic & Integrative College of UKCP

11.15-12.45
WORLD CAFE

Responding to the Changing World
Facilitators Emily Hodgkinson and Sue Milner
World Café is a grassroots method of facilitating collaborative dialogue and harnessing knowledge and creativity. It is fun, simple, informal and efficient. It is an opportunity for all of us attending the conference to gather together, focus on the themes of the day and share our experiences and views.
As a profession we are facing ‘changing times’, not only through the clients we serve but within our own ability to respond to the times in which we live. Our commitment to ‘transforming lives’ is the reason we joined the profession but it seems that increasing polarisation, and marginalisation can bring us to the limits of our work. Through a series of facilitated questions about important social and world issues, we will explore our collective experience of how these manifest in our practice. Through dialogue we can reach out across our comfort zone and challenge our own assumptions and perceptions. We can find ways to learn from each other and strategies for collective change.  How are we, as therapists and as a profession, called to be the times that are changing ?
Format
Small ‘café’ tables of 5 to 10 people, each one with a host, hold a particular question related to the themes of the conference and focused on how a particular social or world issue impacts on our practice. Attendees gather around the table to discuss their answers before moving on to a different table. The discussion is recorded in writing on paper tablecloths and the host summarizes and passes on the previous group’s discussion to the next group, building the dialogue. There is time to circulate to several different tables, enabling us to mix, break the ice and get to know each other. In the plenary at the end we gather together to share the key themes that have emerged and consolidate the learning.
Biographies
Hodgkinson photoEmily Hodgkinson (ProcessworkUK)
Emily has been an accredited member of HIPC for 10 years through ProcessWork UK and is a therapist in private practice.  She is also an experienced trainer and facilitator, with long term interests in diversity, conflict and eco-psychology.  She is a former member of Rhizome, a grassroots facilitator’s co-operative, where she carried out work for grassroots organisations, activist groups and national NGOs, and also involved in the Transition Towns movement delivering training, facilitation and peer support projects.

suemilner2Sue Milner  (ProcessworkUK)
Sue Milner is an accredited Process-Oriented Psychotherapist, Supervisor and Facilitator.  She has worked in private practice for 10 years with individuals, couples and groups and is particularly interested in earth-based spirituality and its dynamic relationship with social activism. She is passionate about diversity, mental health and the environmental crisis and co-founded the HIPC Equality, Diversity and Intersectionality working group. She is inspired by the creative nature of emerging processes and in response to the recent IPCC report on climate change is teaching earth based methods for sustainability and facilitative change.

FULL WORKSHOP PROGRAMME 

SESSION ONE
WORKSHOPS 1 – 9

1.45 – 2.45pm

WORKSHOP 1
WHAT’S RACE GOT TO DO WITH IT?

Power and Powerlessness in Therapy
Workshop Leader: Jessie Emilion
An opportunity to reflect on our positions in this social construct and explore the impact in our personal and professional life. Mapping will be used to enable recognition and make links to the relational process and the power dynamics that underpin such powerful social constructs. Syed Azmatullah will support Jessie in the workshop and, by way of introducing the topic, will give a personal account of how racism has affected him in different countries.

Abstract
The workshop will explore ‘Race’ as a social construct, how this affects the inner and outer realities of individuals and the development of self. Race or Racism evokes different meanings and feelings in us depending on our history and social context. This will be an opportunity to reflect on our positions and explore the impact of this in our personal and professional life. Mapping will be used to enable recognition and make links to the relational process and the power dynamics that underpin such powerful social constructs.
Biographies
IMG-20190507-WA0003Jessie Emilion (Association for Cognitive Analytic Psychotherapy)
Jessie Emilion is a BACP accredited Counsellor and UKCP registered Cognitive Analytic Psychotherapist and Supervisor. She has been working in the NHS for 20 years in various capacities as a senior clinician, trainer and manager. She has an interest in bi-lingualism, culture, language and race and the impact of these factors on mental health, development of self and therapeutic alliance. As a trained interpreter she has extensive experience of working with refugee communities, asylum seekers and voluntary sector organizations both as a clinician and an interpreter.
She teaches on the CAT programmes in the UK, India and in Qatar. She is central to the Introduction of CAT in India and has developed the model further by incorporating religious, cultural and societal values, making it adaptive, appropriate and relevant to the Indian Society and the Indian Psyche.
Jessie Emilion is currently employed as CAT Psychotherapy Lead at the Munro Centre, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

Az pleased low res cropped

Syed Azmatullah (Association of Core Process Psychotherapists)
Azmat is a UKCP accredited Core Process Psychotherapist, EMDR therapist and member of the teaching faculty of the Karuna Institute. 

WORKSHOP 2
BEYOND CONFLICT — RWANDA
Community Recovery and Reconciliation
Workshop Leader: Milan Bijelic 
Presentation of the Community Facilitated Dialogue (Processwork Forum) as a central approach in the programme. This work supports the ongoing efforts in reconciliation, violence prevention and community recovery, in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide. Examples and the purpose of a large group forum — a facilitated community dialogue around painful collective and individual history and finding pathways for building a shared future. There will be discussions among the workshop participants around their perceptions and views related to the historic role of colonial powers and the genocide against the Tutsi.
Abstract
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the collaboration between GER – Kigali and CFOR – London in the programme Beyond Conflict – Rwanda. More detailed illustration will be given around facilitated community dialogue (forum) as a (proposed) part of a central strategy in transitional justice after violent conflict, and alongside tribunals and truth commissions. Short excerpts from the facilitated conversations between the genocide perpetrators and survivors will be given. The role of young people in facilitated discussions will be also specifically described — in relation to prevention of further cycles of mass violence. The workshop participants will have an opportunity to engage in discussions related to historic colonialism in Rwanda and the lack of  international intervention in 1994 to stop the mass killing (as the facilitator’s need for awareness).
The need to bear witness to collective trauma and to search for accountability links psychological, spiritual, social, and political awareness.

Biography
Milan Bijelić (Processwork UK)
milanB (2)Milan is Process-Oriented Psychotherapist and Facilitator. He works in private practice in Sheffield and London. He has a strong interest in collective / social dynamics and in the interplay between our experiences at the collective and individual levels. He is involved in CFOR London as coordinator of the Beyond Conflict – Rwanda programme and in mentoring Community Facilitator Trainees in Kigalli. He is also ‘Who Is Your Neighbour’ project associate in Sheffield through which he facilitates conversations within / between different community groups including asylum seekers and refugees. He has been involved in facilitated public dialogue as part of Sheffield’s Festival of Debate over the last four years.  Milan is registered with HIPC through Processwork UK.

WORKSHOP 3
AN INTERSUBJECTIVE APPROACH TO WORKING WITH ASYLUM SEEKERS AND REFUGEES
Workshop Leader: Lynn Linsdale
An experiential learning experience for participants through demonstration, discussion and role play. The workshop will address the issues of working with an interpreter and vicarious trauma.

Abstract
After a brief introduction to the work of the Trauma Foundation South West (TFSW)  this experiential workshop will particularly focus upon the topic of working with an interpreter. In this respect interpreter Adil Jaifar, a Kurdish Sorani and Arabic speaker, will join participants for group discussions when the following topics might emerge: why would the gist of an intervention get lost in translation? How to create an environment for an interpreter and client to value the therapist’s interventions? How can an embodied approach help when working with interpreters? Is it okay to talk about trivial material? The importance of holding a phenomenological outlook. There will also be an opportunity to work in threes (client, therapist and interpreter) to further tease out how the TFSW uses an intersubjective approach to provide optimum conditions for its clients to recover from traumatic experience.
Biography
Lynn LinsdaleLynn Linsdale (Bath Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
Lynn is a psychotherapist working with the Trauma Foundation South West and in private practice undertaking therapy, supervision and teaching.  In addition to working with individual asylum seekers and refugees Lynn works closely with Bristol staff and volunteers who support this client group in her role as outreach manager. This experience gives her insight into the everyday life of an asylum seeker; from arrival at a NHS first response centre to meeting basic needs for food, shelter, advocacy, social and mental health care provision from numerous agencies sharing the City of Sanctuary ethos in Bristol.
Lynn’s passion is to find ways to use a psychotherapeutic approach to help those who find themselves financially impoverished. In practice this finds Lynn on foot around the city visiting drop-in and medical centres to supervise groups and provide workshops with a view to building resilience and preventing vicarious trauma.

WORKSHOP 4
GENDER VARIANCE
Transitioning Lives
Workshop leader: Liza Heatley

This will be an interactive, participative workshop where we will learn more about clients who identify as gender variant or questioning.
Abstract
The workshop will offer an opportunity to learn about people who identify as gender variant including Transgender, non-binary and gender fluid whose experience does not meet the expectations of our society. As a result, people identifying as Gender Variant may feel marginalised and excluded in a gender binary society. We will consider some of the unique challenges posed in achieving mind-body congruence.
Biography 
liza-heatley.jpegLiza Heatley (UK Association for Transactional Analysis)
Liza is a Psychotherapist and Provisional Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst (PTSTA) CTA (P), MSc Psychotherapy, BACP Accred. She works within the NHS as a specialist Psychotherapist at the West of England Specialist Gender Identity Clinic and in private practice as a psychotherapist, supervisor and trainer and is based in South Devon. She is a member of UKATA’s Diversity and Social Responsibility Committee.

WORKSHOP 5
WILD AT HEART
Workshop leader: Michelle Whiteside 

Abstract
Alienation from the natural world is significant in our states of mental health. This workshop will take you into the surrounding outdoors to experience direct contact with nature and view yourself from a different perspective. The workshop will look at how this might enhance your own practice with those clients who might benefit from a different approach.
Biography
me in garden 2019Michelle Whiteside (Re-Vision)
I am a registered Integrative Psychosynthesis UKCP Psychotherapist and Supervisor and a BACP Accredited Counsellor with many years of experience in this field which includes teaching at degree level as well as supervising many qualified and trainee therapists, individually or in groups.
In 2016 I trained as a Wild Therapist with Nick Totton, exploring our own nature through nature and the outdoors. The work can continue back in the therapy room, allowing it to Reshape, Revision and Re-enliven our views of ourselves and opening up the therapeutic relationship in unexpected ways. In 2018 I also did Nick Totton’s Embodied Relational Therapy Training deepening my work with the body as a seat of our emotions.
My interests and personal practice in meditation, yoga and spirituality over 30 years ago supported my desire to train as a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction programme Teacher in 2010 at Bangor University Centre for Mindfulness. I have gone on to teach many groups as well as to teach 1:1 in my private practice.

WORKSHOP 6
STAYING ALIVE
Working Creatively In An NHS Renal Unit
Workshop leader: Gillian Chumbley
How do you as therapist keep true to the spirit of your practice within an organization which may not necessarily understand your ways of working? How do you keep your practice “awake and alive” and express your creativity in the workplace?
Abstract
In this workshop I will give a flavour of how I have experienced working as a psychotherapist in an NHS Renal transplant and dialysis unit of a large teaching hospital. My body psychotherapy approaches with patients and staff include trauma work, managing the ever-present stress and anxiety inherent with chronic illness, use of mindfulness and relaxation, imagery, boundary work, body awareness, working with ANS arousal, self-soothing, dream exploration, writing, drawing and painting.
I find my creativity enhanced when sharing psychotherapy theory/ideas with others in different fields and disciplines. I have enjoyed collaborating with Cambridge University in two projects which I would also like to present.
1 “Curiosities & Conversations” Cambridge University Museum consortium staff bring various museum artifacts to the renal patient bedside to help stimulate engagement, curiosity and interest during dialysis treatment.
2 “Workplace dilemmas” Facilitating workshops with Cambridge University Faculty of Education philosophy, theology and science students on the psychological and ethical dilemmas of living-donor kidney transplantation.
Biography
025Gillian Chumbley MSc. UKCP (Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre)
Gill is a registered body psychotherapist, counsellor and qualified somatic trauma therapist working in the field for 20 years. She works in the NHS at Addenbrookes hospital, Cambridge, with renal transplant & dialysis units providing individual, couple and group therapy for patients, carers and families. Gill offers counselling to adolescents with renal problems as part of the Young Adult Transplant team. She also offers supervision and training to NHS staff and teaches pre- and post-registration nurses.
Gill has worked as a science teacher in a London secondary school; as a Research Immunologist at Cambridge University; as a therapist and teacher at the Cambridge Body Psychotherapy Centre; as therapist and supervisor with adolescents at Centre 33 in Cambridge; in secondary schools as school counsellor for 10 years and as a Cambridge University student counselling supervisor.

WORKSHOP 7
WORKING WITH AUTISTIC CLIENTS
Workshop leader: Katherine Uher 

What does a diagnosis of autism mean and what are the secondary mental health issues that arise when a person experiences a lack of understanding from the dominant culture? The workshop will include roleplay and reflection and the opportunity to experience life in a more autistic way.
Abstract
People on the spectrum vary in terms of presentation and need, but anyone with a diagnosis of autism should share some basic core traits. We will look at these traits and how they might impact on the client’s experience in the world throughout their lives. Common issues that come up might include: Lack of self understanding, a fear of not being properly understood by others, resentment over a past or present in which they are missed by others, a natural difficulty in explaining their inner experience but also a learned difficulty in doing so. My hope is that a better understanding of how such issues might arise for people on the spectrum will enable the therapist to better empathize with their autistic clients.
Biography
pic-223x300

Katherine Uher (Northern Guild for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
I am a writer and psychotherapist living in the north east of England with my family. Throughout my life I have gained experience working with children with special needs, most specifically autism. In my spare time, I give talks and offer training sessions to parents and to professionals who care for children with ASD.

WORKSHOP 8
PANEL DISCUSSION: TALKING THERAPIES IN THE NHS

The State of Play
A panel of practitioners experienced in working in the context of the NHS will review the current scene and bring us up to date on the impact of projects such as Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT), the Scope of Practice and Education framework (SCoPed) and the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE).
Abstract
UN reports have highlighted an increase in the UK in poverty, homelessness and those suffering from the harsh realities of austerity, inequality and the uncertainty of the gig economy. In this climate talking therapies have a vital role to play in the public sector. Successive White Papers on Health have pledged parity of public healthcare provision between mental and physical health. How true is this today? 
How easily can clients access talking therapies in the NHS? Is there equity of access to a diverse range of approaches? Can clients be assured that their psychological needs will be adequately met? Is psychological therapy only readily available in the NHS in reaction to a crisis such as Grenfell or to reduce the waiting lists? Can practitioners be assured of a fair pay structure? These are some of the questions that will be explored. Bring your own concerns and experience to help build a strategy that can make a difference.
Facilitator Tricia Scott
Martin Pollecoff will discuss the intentions behind the SCoPed framework and how it might impact on the provision of talking therapies in the NHS. He will update us on the work of UKCP to influence the NICE guidelines for commissioning Psychotherapy services and improve the status of the profession. He will answer questions and listen to concerns.
Georgina Burns will share her experience of the benefits and challenges of working in the NHS and in the context of Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT). She will describe the challenges and rewards of short-term interventions and the expectations placed on practitioners to provide a ‘manualised’ approach. She will address the effects of socio-economic pressures on clinical work.
Rozmin Mukhi will address issues of working with traumatic incidents and chronic illnesses within the culture of the NHS and the medical model. Is the priority ‘how quickly can we discharge patients’ rather than ‘how best can we support the patient’? She will introduce Steve Dale who will share his experience from a patient’s perspective of the psychological impact of undergoing a kidney transplant. He will discuss the lack of psychological support in facing the moral and ethical dilemma of accepting a donor kidney as well as an earlier discharge than in the past.
Biographies
IMG_0492Tricia Scott MSc University of Surrey; UKAHHP accredited Individual  and Group Psychotherapist 1992; UKCP Fellow 2006 (HIPC Direct Member)
Since 1969 Tricia has been amongst the pioneers of the humanistic movement in Britain. She trained in Reichian and Bioenergetic Psychotherapy and led the Network Training and Therapeutic Community for fifteen years. She worked in the NHS for more than ten years – in General Practice, in the diabetes’ clinics at St Thomas and Guys Hospitals and at Kings College Hospital with groups of GPs taking a break from practice. She was commissioned by East Surrey Mental Health and Learning Disabilities NHS Trust to develop and lead trainings from BTEC to Masters level. Her book ‘Integrative Psychotherapy in Healthcare: A Humanistic Approach’ offers an Intersubjective framework for short-term work that addresses physical, emotional and spiritual experience in the intra-personal, interpersonal and extra-personal spheres. She chaired UKCP’s NHS Committee and HIPC’s Working Group in the Department of Health’s Skills for Health Project. She has led three national conferences on Psychotherapy in the NHS.
img_1038.jpgMartin Pollecoff MSc CASS, MSc Psych (Metanoia), Chair United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy
Martin was elected Chair of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy in 2015. He is an integrative Psychotherapist trained at Metanoia. He also holds a Masters Degree from Surrey University in Change Agent Skills and Strategies.  This was a humanistic degree founded by John Rowan.  His dissertation was on Mythos. He has been a trustee, then Chair of the Minster Centre,  and a trustee, then Chair of the Association of Humanistic Psychology, plus a trustee then Chair of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy. In 2003 he started ‘The Long Boat Home’ an organisation to support veterans and their families. His speciality is working with people in crisis. From 1977 to 1996 he lived and worked in a Psycho-Spiritual Community.
IMG_2447Georgina Burns (HIP College Direct Member)
Georgina is a UKCP accredited integrative psychotherapist trained at the Metanoia Institute. She has ten years’ experience of working in the NHS, predominantly in a London ‘Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)’ service, where she started out as a low-intensity CBT practitioner. She is an accredited practitioner in Inter-Personal Therapy for Depression (IPT) and has worked with patients in NHS secondary care, using the Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) model. She believes the NHS should offer a range of flexible psychological treatments, including integrative and humanistic approaches, and should foster a diverse workforce to facilitate this. She is the Direct Member representative for HIPC.
Roz Feb 2019Rozmin Mukhi (HIP College Direct Member) Psychotherapist & Counsellor MSC, ADIP, UKCP, MBACP Snr Acc, EMDR Practitioner
Rozmin is an Integrative Psychotherapist with experience in both statutory and private practice, dividing her time between London and South Yorkshire. She currently works in the Grenfell Health & Wellbeing Service working with people affected by trauma as Grenfell Specialist Psychotherapist. She is registered as a Direct Member of HIP College, she is UKCP Regional Representative for Midlands and East of England, Member of the HIP College Steering Committee, Member of HIP College Ethics Committee, Direct Member Delegate for HIP College, UKCP Reg Clinical Supervisor. Rozmin is registered Acc Snr Member of BACP as well as qualified EMDR practitioner. Rozmin’s special interests include challenging unconscious bias and working particularly with under privileged people in society.

WORKSHOP 9
CREATIVITY, HUMAN RELATIONSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT 
The Scope of Contemporary Therapeutic Practice with Children and Young People
Two workshops (workshop 9 in Session One and workshop 10 in Session Two) will demonstrate a range of work with children and young and people.
There will be presentations from psychotherapists and therapeutic practitioners of their work in different contexts and including themes such as parent-infant psychotherapy, parental alienation, working with families and addiction, whole school approaches to wellbeing, therapeutic play with adopted children and families, healing youth violence, and the impact of social media and knife crime on young people.
Chaired by Jocelyne Quennell  and Amina Thompson
Yvonne Osafao will introduce parent-infant psychotherapy.
Jennie McNamara will speak on parental alienation.
Joanna Parker will explore the themes in therapeutic practice with families where addiction is the challenge.

Biographies

Jo PictureJocelyne Quennell is Director of the Wellbeing Faculty at the Institute for Arts in Therapy and Education where she was formerly the Principal.  Jocelyne has thirty years of experience in the field of psychotherapy and the arts therapies and is a Fellow of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy. She is the convener of the Humanistic and Integrative Psychotherapy College Working Group for Children and Young People and has contributed over many years to the development of standards in education, training, ethics and supervision for work with children and young people. She is committed to enhancing quality and increasing access to services for families and communities, creative and relational perspectives and in particular therapeutic and multi-disciplinary approaches to wellbeing.
Amina Hajjaj ThomsonAmina Hajjaj Thomson (Terapia)
Amina is currently in training as a Child Psychotherapist. She has ten years of experience working in schools and two years at the Marlborough Family Service. She has completed the NAFSIYAT training in Islamic Counselling and Psychotherapy, and the CPCAB Certificate in Therapeutic Counselling. Experienced in community development and housing, she set up the Malja Housing Co-op, and is a founder member of Al Shahada Housing Association and Director/Chair of Sunday Arabic School in Westminster, a trustee member of An-Nisa Society Women’s Helpline. In July 2017 she began work with clients in Al Manar Mosque with people of Grenfell Tower and began Heartfulness Faith Based Therapy which is an Integration of Spirituality and Psychotherapy for the survivors and the bereaved.

Yvonne Osafao (Terapia)
Yvonne is a parent-infant psychotherapist and Clinical Lead of the Croydon Parent-Infant Partnership (PIP).  She also takes a lead in early intervention in the first two years of life at West London Action for Children (WLAC). She is a Fellow of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust for Early Years Intervention and Prevention. She has travelled in the USA and Scandinavia to learn from best practice in parent-infant psychotherapy.  She completed her doctorate in psychoanalytic parent-infant psychotherapy at the University of Essex and teaches baby observation at Terapia Institute.  Yvonne will be presenting a case study to illustrate how to expel the ‘ghosts’ from the nursery’; these are the harmful intergenerational patterns that unconsciously invade the parent-infant relationship.  

Joanna Parker (Institute for Arts in Therapy and Education)   
Joanna is a UKCP registered Integrative Arts Psychotherapist. She has a Diploma in Supervision and is certified in Child Therapeutic Skills. Before training as a Psychotherapist, she studied Fine Art (BA Hons) and is an artist led practitioner. Having worked in a range of settings, Joanna is currently working in adoption at PAC-UK. Prior to this Joanna was the Young Oasis Lead, managing a multi-disciplinary Child & Family team, as part of the Brighton Oasis Project. Young Oasis supports families affected by drug or alcohol misuse. This presentation will look at Young Oasis, where Joanna was instrumental in developing and delivering a range of art-based projects at Young Oasis over 10 years. This culminated in the Art of Attachment project, which was conceived as a way of researching and exploring individual experiences of attachment through art. Funded by the Welcome Trust and Arts Council England a programme of workshops/exhibitions/seminars took place over 18 months. Adults in treatment services and their children were engaged in an exploration of substance misuse, parenting and the accompanying attachment issues.

SESSION TWO
WORKSHOPS 10 – 18

3.15 – 4.15

WORKSHOP 10
CREATIVITY, HUMAN RELATIONSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT 
The Scope of Contemporary Therapeutic Practice with Children and Young People
Chaired by Lizzie Smosarski and Derek Williams
Lydia Noor will present on whole school wellbeing.
Louis Sydney will share therapeutic play with adopted children.
Ebinehita Lyere will talk about healing youth violence and knife crime.

Biographies

Lizzie SmosarskiLizzie Smosarski has an MA in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy from CCPE (The Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling Education), She has worked with children, adolescents and adult clients for over thirty years including a BA in Psychology, training in Integrative Arts Psychotherapy, Supervision at Metanoia and has been a tutor at Terapia and IATE for many years. She is one of the Founders of the Therapeutic Wellbeing Practitioner training at the Wellbeing Faculty at IATE

Derek WilliamsDerek Williams is a Therapeutic Wellbeing Practitioner trained at IATE with a commitment to health and fitness for young people to increase their confidence, aspiration and abilities. He is former European and Commonwealth boxing champion and has long history of motivational speaking, inspiring youth towards achieving their goals. He is Chair of the Pedro Club in Hackney where he works with James Cook OBE to support young people to avoid gang culture, drugs and standing against street violence and strengthening community. He has bought the boxing community together to address knife crime and is committed to understanding the roots of violence in the realities of childhood trauma and adverse childhood experiences.

Lydia Noor (Scarborough Counselling and Psychotherapy Training Institute)
Lydia is currently a director of SCPTI where she is the course leader for the Diploma in Integrative Psychotherapy.  She has spent over forty years working with children and young people in a range of educational and therapeutic settings.  From her experience as a teacher and senior leader, she recognised that the wellbeing of children impacts their access to learning. After training in integrative psychotherapy, she developed courses in Therapeutic Skills, specifically for school and family environments to enrich the culture, challenge policies and procedures to provide a more emotionally responsive and containing environment for both children and adults.  More recently, she has been closely involved in the development of training standards for Therapeutic Wellbeing Practice for contextual working with children, young people, organisations, families and communities.  Lydia’s interest in working at the interface of therapy and education, focuses on skilling the adults surrounding the child.  She works from the position of developing therapeutically informed relational practitioners in contexts where children and young people live, learn and play.  This workshop will present two examples of developing therapeutic wellbeing practice in a primary and secondary school through training and supervision and will briefly include her findings from research in this field. 

Louis Sydney (Institute for Arts in Therapy and Education)
Louis Sydney is a child, young person and adult psychotherapist. He has also trained in Psychosynthesis, Dan Hughes’ DDP, Theraplay and is a Somatic Experience Practitioner (a body-based approach to working with trauma). Louis is a registered therapist to work with fostered & adopted children (ASART) and worked with Family Futures (an organization that provides attachment and trauma-based therapy for children who are fostered or adopted) for 9 ½ years and Adoptionplus. Louis also provides training, consultation and supervision. His particular areas of interest are in arts-based psychotherapy, attachment focussed and trauma informed parenting and in therapeutic play.

Ebinehita Iyere  (Institute for Arts in Therapy and Education)
Ebinehita has a Bsc Criminology and youth studies, she is also training in Therapeutic Wellbeing Practice in the Wellbeing Faculty at IATE. She is the Project Lead for Juvenis, a charity based in Lambeth that supports young people, regardless of the things that have held them back previously giving them a space to express themselves safely and creatively in schools and the community. She is also a member of the partnership reference group for the London VRU (Violence Reduction Unit) with the Mayor of London and is committed to the Adverse Childhood Experiences movement. Ebinehita’s presentation will explore the journey of development within organisations aimed at healing youth violence towards more therapeutically minded and trauma-informed approaches. 

WORKSHOP 11
EVERY MOMENT OF PSYCHOTHERAPY IS RESEARCH
Workshop leaders: Heward Wilkinson and Julie Scully 

A short introduction will outline the elements of the HIPC Research contributions. Drawing on the passion of a new generation, there will be poster presentations led by HIPC Students, together with a Workshop to open up and dialogue about HIPC Approaches to Research.
Abstract
The workshop will include showcasing the three major approaches to Research in Psychotherapy: Quantitative (Probabilistic) Research, not overmuch used within the HIPC Community, but still necessary as background ; Qualitative Research, which is the norm in the HIPC Community, with its several paradigms of enquiry; and, overlapping with Qualitative Research, and still entering the field, Philosophical Research Enquiry, which takes its point of departure from the reality, that all Psychotherapy is or includes meta-reflexive enquiry and process. This is implicitly philosophical before it is empirical, with the result that, little as we tend to notice it, every single moment of psychotherapy work is indeed research, and the problem becomes, how can we enable this not to go unrecorded?
Biographies
HW3Dr Heward Wilkinson
(Scarborough Counselling and Psychotherapy Training Institute)

Heward is co-chair with Julie of the Research Committee of the HIP College. He has a long involvement with HIPC and UKCP, for over 30 years, and is also currently Vice-President of the European Association for Integrative Psychotherapy. In his book The Muse as Therapist, and related work, he developed the poetic paradigm for psychotherapy. He was Senior Editor of International Journal for Psychotherapy for 10 years. His present research enquiries are directed towards further articulating the philosophical understanding of Psychotherapy as a paradigm of historically-narrative-based form of enquiry, rather than one primarily leaning on the sciences. His literary passion is especially in Shakespeare, and philosophically he explores existential-phenomenological and Hegelian interests.
IMG_3800 copyJulie Scully
(Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education)

Julie is a psychotherapist, supervisor and training supervisor in private practice. Her primary research activity is CSA and CSE. The home of her research is the Centre for Gender Violence within the School of Social Policy at the University of Bristol. Julie’s other research interests include teaching and supervising research projects, research ethics, creative and traditional methodology, and sensitive and complex studies.
Passionate about student training, education and research in counselling and psychotherapy she is also the Director of Professional and Academic Studies at the Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education where she directs the Research MA and consults on the Professional Doctorate programme.

WORKSHOP 12
WORKING WITH DISABILITY THROUGH DANCE MOVEMENT PSYCHOTHERAPY

Workshop leader: Jackie Edwards 

The use of Dance Movement Psychotherapy in the context of supporting non-verbal communication and expressing psychological and emotional needs will be presented.  Potential contributions of Dance Movement Psychotherapy to addressing behaviour described as challenging will also be considered.  The workshop will make connections with the value of these ways of working for children and adults with a disability, family carers and health care professionals’ supporting children and adults with a disability such as Autism, Learning Disabilities, or Dementia.
Abstract
In this workshop the use of Dance Movement Psychotherapy in the context of supporting non-verbal communication and expressing psychological and emotional needs will be some of the themes presented.  Potential contributions of Dance Movement Psychotherapy to addressing behaviour described as challenging will also be considered.  The workshop will conclude by making connections with the value of these ways of working for children and adults with a disability, family carers and health care professionals’ supporting children and adults with a disability such as Autism, Learning Disabilities, or Dementia.
Biography
DSCN0291 Photo for Conference 2018Jackie Edwards (Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy)
Jackie Edwards is a Registered Dance Movement Psychotherapist working for the NHS within an Arts Psychotherapies team and in private practice. Jackie represents the Arts Psychotherapies on the Learning Disability Senate; is Chair of the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK Ltd); and a Ph.D. candidate at Bristol University. Jackie won the Body, Movement and Dance Psychotherapy (BMDP) international journal new researcher award and the Royal College of Psychiatry carer contribution award in 2014. She has previous experience of working with local authorities, the Department of Health, the National Autism Programme Board, and is a Member of the Challenging Behaviour National Strategy Group.

WORKSHOP 13
WORKING WITH CLIENTS IN CRISIS IN THE WAKE OF RECENT TRAUMATIC EVENTS
Workshop Leader: Rozmin Mukhi

Experiential exploration of working in integrative ways through case studies. In this workshop we will explore working with clients in crisis and suffering from traumatic events.
Abstract
The workshop will look at diverse ways of working with complexes such as culture and religion taking into account clients that are disenfranchised at multiple levels in society. The workshop will explore effective approaches and solutions to maximise therapeutic outcomes.
The workshop will also touch on the personal cost of working with this complex group of people including strategies of self-care.
There will be discussions in small groups exploring different ways of working with composite case studies based on practical experience with feedback and discussion in the larger group.
Biography
Roz Feb 2019Rozmin Mukhi (HIP College Direct Member) Psychotherapist & Counsellor MSC, ADIP, UKCP, MBACP Snr Acc, EMDR Practitioner
Rozmin is an Integrative Psychotherapist with experience in both statutory and private practice, dividing her time between London and South Yorkshire. She currently works in the Grenfell Health & Wellbeing Service working with people affected by trauma as Grenfell Specialist Psychotherapist.
She is registered as a Direct Member of HIP College, she is UKCP Regional Representative for Midlands and East of England, Member of the HIP College Steering Committee, Member of HIP College Ethics Committee, Direct Member Delegate for HIP College, UKCP Reg Clinical Supervisor. Rozmin is registered Acc Snr Member of BACP as well as qualified EMDR practitioner.
Rozmin’s special interests include challenging unconscious bias and working particularly with under privileged people in society.

WORKSHOP 14
MINDFULNESS AND EMBODIED PRESENCE
Presenter: Maura Sills 

The workshop will provide an opportunity to experience ‘mindfulness and embodied presence’ as taught and practiced by Karuna. We will explore the ways in which this approach can be helpful to practitioners in their own self-care as well as its application in their own practice.
Abstract
During this workshop, we will explore the subtle and subliminal qualities of embodied mind will be cultivated to re-sensitize us to aspects of our human beingness. This may help us expand our awareness beyond the usual boundaries of thought, imagination and looking. This supports us in knowing an embodied sense of belonging, interconnection and deepening ethical relationship to others, nature and the great mystery of our less conditioned mind.
Biography
image001Maura Sills (Karuna Institute)
Maura Sills is the Founder of the Karuna Institute, established in 1984, offering Master’s Degree Trainings in Core process Psychotherapy and Mindfulness Based Psychotherapeutic Practice.  Maura was a Buddhist nun for a time and is an Honorary Fellow of UKCP.

WORKSHOP 15
WHITE PRIVILEGE AS A BARRIER IN  THE THERAPEUTIC ENCOUNTER

Workshop Leader: Martin Armitage-Smith
This experiential workshop seeks to address a gap in the consciousness of white practitioners around whiteness and its impacts. We make use of recent theoretical work in order to raise our awareness in this important area.
Abstract
It is long overdue for white people to recognise the unconscious privilege they have. As psychotherapists we need to start addressing this issue both internally and with awareness of the impact of this dynamic on our work. In this experiential workshop we will focus on acknowledging these privileges, using Judy Ryde’s white awareness model, as well as somatic, systemic and depth psychology perspectives. Participation by people of colour is warmly welcomed. Through awareness of the historical context and the socio-political and psychological impacts this dynamic has had to this day, a more relational trans-cultural therapeutic alliance becomes possible.
Biography
Martin Armitage-Smith (Institute of Psychosynthesis)
Martin Armitage Smith
Martin has lived, studied and worked in North and East Africa and is married to Jannet who is of Kenyan heritage. He holds MAs from Cambridge University and the Institute of Psychosynthesis. His client base is made up primarily of 3 groups: people of dual heritage, those in relationships with people from other races or cultures, and boarding school survivors. He is interested in the dialogue between descendants of the colonised and the coloniser and his MA thesis explored Impacts on Identity arising from Colonialism. His forthcoming book addresses the history and impacts of a suggested split in Western psyche and what to do about it.

WORKSHOP 16
OUR BODIES OUR EARTH
Earth Needs A Good Therapist
Workshop leader: Tree Staunton

Every day in the media we hear worrying news about our planet’s worsening situation: scientists warn of imminent catastrophic climate change, environmental collapse and species extinction: dangers we cannot escape. What impact does this have on us and our clients? How do we deal with our awareness of this unfolding disaster? And what does the world need from us at this time?
Abstract
Opening our senses to the reality of what we face at this time is challenging. This workshop calls us to connect to the wisdom of the body as we explore what it means to be therapists living in a time of environmental breakdown and the possible threat to our future life on earth. Through body & image we will explore our responses and ‘metabolise’ this knowledge.  We need to find ways to resource ourselves, to find resilience to meet these challenges, and to maintain our integrity so that we can be there for others.
Biography
image001.jpegTree Staunton (Bath Centre for Psychotherapy and Counselling)
Tree is overall Director of BCPC, and Programme Leader for the MA with Middlesex University.  She is a UKCP Honorary Fellow, body psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor, editor of Body Psychotherapy, Advancing Theory in Therapy (2002) and current editor of the British Journal for Psychotherapy Integration. Since becoming overall Director of BCPC, she is a non-clinical member of UKCP. Tree has a special interest in the links between psychotherapy and the current global crises we face, and is a long-standing member of Climate Psychology Alliance (CPA). She lives in a Cohousing Community in Stroud UK.

WORKSHOP 17
BEYOND SIMPLISTIC SEXUALITY BINARIES 

Workshop leader: Grant Denkinson 

How do we feel when a client tells us they are neither straight nor gay? What if someone is struggling to find words to describe fluidity in their attractions? How do we support someone navigating relationships that don’t neatly divide between partners or friends or intimacies that are sort of sexual and sort of non-sexual?
Abstract
Let’s spend some time talking together about how we feel when we encounter sexualities and relationships that would be misrepresented by dividing the world of experience into two parts. I’ll bring some examples. Do we feel free or frightened, creative or confused when we can’t categorise in more usual ways? How might clients be feeling and how might others react?
While aiming to accept clients with different sexual orientations equally we may still be assuming people can be neatly divided into categories such as straight and gay.
Bisexual or queer lives through lenses of identity, attraction and behaviour can challenge allocating people into separate, persistent and simply labelled boxes. Likewise, “partner” can mean different things to different people at different times. Do we miss or erase clients’ lived worlds by imposing words?
To later stay with clients’ thoughts, feelings and experiences that defy word boundaries it helps to have processed our reactions to encountering for example bisexuality or non-monogamy.
Biography
image1Grant Denkinson MA Integrative Psychotherapy UKCP MBACP – (Registrant   Sherwood Institute)
Grant has been a psychotherapist / counsellor for ten years part time in private practice, student support and for a charity supporting male abuse survivors. He’s been closely involved with gender, sexuality and relationship diversity movements for 25 years running events, giving talks and training workshops, writing book chapters and giving media appearances. He researched bisexual people’s experiences of emotional support services and helped set up an LGBT specific IAPT pilot. He has been part of an Equality, Diversity and Inclusion working group looking initially at improving psychotherapy training. Other than for reaccreditation, he is not affiliated with any UKCP training organisation. Grant feels most at home personally and as a community organiser under a big, broad and colourful gender, sexuality and relationship diversity umbrella.

WORKSHOP 18
COMMUNITY FORUMS

Brexit and Beyond
Workshop leaders: Milan and Leah Bijelic
Presentation and facilitated dialogue among workshop participants on a theme related to Brexit.

Abstract
We will share our experience of facilitating a series of public dialogues around issues of social marginalisation and social cohesion in Sheffield.  The increase in hate incidents in the post-Brexit period motivated us to organise these events. Processwork provides tools to support awareness of how broader social dynamics are happening within us as individuals, in our relationships, and in our communities. We facilitated different positions and experiences in participants, supporting dialogue between them and awareness of the relationship between personal and collective experience.
In the second part of the workshop we will together, within the workshop participant group, explore and interact around our different positions and experiences around the Brexit related theme.
Biographies
LeahB photoLeah Bijelić (Processwork UK)
Leah is a Process-Oriented Psychotherapist, Supervisor, and Facilitator with experience of work in the third sector, in the HE sector and in private practice.  She currently works in private practice and as a therapist and supervisor at the Student Counselling Service at the University of Sheffield. She also facilitates dialogue in community as part of South Yorkshire’s ‘Who Is Your Neighbour?’ Project and has facilitated public dialogue as part of Sheffield’s Festival of Debate over the last four years.  Leah is registered with HIPC through Processwork UK.  Leah has a keen interest in dynamics of power, privilege and marginalisation and is interested in how we each support ourselves to stay in relationship when things get hot.
milanB (2)Milan Bijelic (Processwork UK)
Milan is Process-Oriented Psychotherapist and Facilitator and works in private practice in Sheffield and London. He has a strong interest in collective/social dynamics and in the interplay between our experiences at the collective and individual levels. He is involved in CFOR London as coordinator of the Beyond Conflict – Rwanda programme and in mentoring Community Facilitator Trainees in Kigalli.
He is also ‘Who Is Your Neighbour’ project associate in Sheffield through which he facilitates conversations within / between different community groups including asylum seekers and refugees. He has been involved in facilitated public dialogue as part of Sheffield’s Festival of Debate over the last four years.

Fees and Booking

(Prices include an eventbrite booking fee)

UKCP Members — £48.56

UKCP Student and Trainee Members  — £21.91

Non-Members — £64.55

Non-Member Students and Trainees — £37.90

Book here: https://hipc.eventbrite.co.uk